PROBLEM SOLVING KS1 NRICH

  • December 9, 2019

Always, Sometimes or Never? Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: In this calculation, the box represents a missing digit. Age 5 to 7 Conjecturing and Generalising at KS1 The tasks in this collection encourage lower primary children to conjecture and generalise. There are three baskets, a brown one, a red one and a pink one, holding a total of 10 eggs. Age 7 to 11 Conjecturing and Generalising at KS2 The tasks in this collection encourage upper primary children to conjecture and generalise.

KS1 Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: In this calculation, the box represents a missing digit. How Do You See It? Pairs of Numbers Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: In how many different ways can they build their houses?

Number Balance Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: To support this aim, members of the NRICH team work in a wide range of capacities, including providing professional development for teachers wishing to embed rich mathematical tasks into everyday classroom practice.

Work out the sequence problem complete.

problem solving ks1 nrich

Starting from the end sounds rather strange, but in fact can be a very useful problem-solving skill. This problem challenges you to find out how many odd numbers there are between pairs of numbers.

Patterns and Sequences KS1

This article, written for primary teachers, discusses what we mean by ‘problem-solving skills’ and draws attention ptoblem NRICH tasks which can help develop specific skills. Scroll down to see groups of tasks from the site which will give learners experience of specific skills. What’s All the Talking About?

  KS3 ESSAY WRITING

Number Book Age 3 to 5 Counting reliably with numbers from 1 to 20 Sorting and describing.

Addition and Subtraction KS1. Find all the numbers that can be made by adding the dots on two dice.

Addition and Subtraction KS1 :

Can you find a pair of numbers that has four odds between them? In this article for teachers, Lynne explains why it should be.

problem solving ks1 nrich

Register for our mailing list. These activities focus on finding all possible solutions so working in a systematic way will ensure none are left out.

Can you convince us that you have found them all? Secret Number Age solvin to 7 Challenge Level: Register for our mailing list.

Scroll down to see our complete collection of KS1 problems that require children to work systematically, or explore the two sub-collections focusing on important aspects of systematic working.

Biscuit Decorations Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: Which ones do you have to nrich out? What Could It Be?

Patterns and Sequences KS1 :

How would you find out how many football cards Catrina has collected? Can you choose sets of numbers to collect so that you spin six numbers belonging to your sets in as few spins as possible?

  UTSA ESSAY PROMPTS 2016

These lower primary tasks could all be tackled using a trial and improvement approach. Sell ks1 solves problem maths a profit.

Problem-solving Skills

Annie and Ben are playing a game with a calculator. Can you find problem paths of your solve What Was in the Box?

problem solving ks1 nrich

In this problem it is not the squares that jump, you do the jumping! In how many different ways can they build their houses? How could you record what you’ve done? Here are some short problems for you to try. Can you swap the frogs and toads in as few slides and jumps as possible?

Two Spinners Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: How many different triangles can you draw on the dotty grid which each have one dot in the middle? What strategies did you use?

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: